Beat the Peak | OEC News

Members on the time-of-use rate can find ways to save

Looking around your home, you likely have more devices and equipment that require electricity than ever before. Our connected lives are increasingly dependent on more electricity to function. At the same time, as demand for electricity rises, Oklahoma Electric Cooperative must deliver an uninterrupted 24/7 power supply––regardless of market conditions or other circumstances.

As you would expect, based on your family’s habits, electricity use fluctuates throughout the day based on consumer demand. OEC must be able to provide enough electricity to meet the energy needs of all members on our time-of-use rate during times of highest energy use or “peak hours.” During winter months, these peak times are typically in the morning as people start their day and in the evening as they return home.

What you may not know is that electric utilities, including OEC, typically pay more for electricity––either from a power plant or another utility with excess power––during those morning and evening “energy rush hours.” In addition, the demand for electricity is even higher when it is especially cold outside when heating systems must run longer to warm our homes.

If the “peak times” concept is a bit puzzling, here’s an easy way to think about it, and it is similar to a major concert. We know costs go up when there is strong demand for tickets (or electricity), and both are subject to the basic economic laws of supply and demand. When a lot of people want the same thing, it is more expensive.

When they don’t, it’s cheaper––like a bargain matinee or an “early bird” special at a restaurant.

At OEC, our default rate is the standard residential rate, which does not include peak hours. If you are on this rate, there is no need to worry about peak hours.

Our time-of-use rate includes peak hours between 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. Monday through Friday between June 1 and August 31.

WAYS TO SAVE

During peak periods when the cost to produce and purchase power is higher, we encourage you to take simple steps to save energy, such as turning your thermostat down a few notches, turning off unnecessary lights and waiting to use large appliances during off-peak times.

You can also save energy by plugging electronics and equipment such as computers, printers and TVs into a power strip, then turning it off at the switch during peak hours. If you have a programmable thermostat, adjust the settings to sync up with off-peak rate periods. When we all work together to reduce energy use during periods of high electricity demand, we can relieve pressure on the grid and save a little money along the way.

Another benefit of this time-of-use approach to electricity use is that it allows greater control over your bill. Reducing the peak impacts the power-supply cost to every co-op member. This is particularly noticeable as energy costs have risen across the U.S. Collectively, everyone conserving energy and making small changes can truly make a difference.

Remember, taking simple steps to save energy throughout the day and shifting energy-intensive chores to off-peak hours is a smart choice for you and our community. Visit okcoop.com/rates/ to learn more about our rates, peak energy times and which rate works best for you.

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Into the Sunset | OEC News

As the chair of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Engineering Subcommittee for Power Quality and Reliability, Nick Shumaker will help electric cooperatives face the challenges and opportunities of the future.

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Into the Sunset | OEC News

Two giants of OEC culture retire

John Spencer

A lot has changed at OEC in the last 42 years, but one thing remained constant, the steady and hardworking presence of John Spencer.

John initially joined OEC in the operations department in 1980 for $4.80 an hour. Throughout his impressive four-decade-long tenure, he filled various essential roles within the organization, including manager and Vice President of Metering.

His exemplary work ethic and commitment to excellence made him well-respected among colleagues, coworkers and members.

“42 years is the longest someone has ever worked at OEC,” said Patrick Grace, OEC CEO. “He has been a valuable employee for a long time. We appreciate him and will miss his presence greatly.”

With decades of experience under his belt and unwavering loyalty to OEC’s vision, John leaves a legacy that will be fondly remembered by all who worked alongside him. OEC and its people will not soon forget his impact.

Congratulations, John Spencer!

Janet Maginnis

Janet Maginnis has been a treasured Oklahoma Electric Cooperative team member for 25 years.

Janet joined OEC in the 1980s for a short stint, eventually returning to begin her career in our human resources department. She spent the next 20 years as a source of expertise and dedication to programs benefitting employees.

“Her dedication to OEC’s employees was unparalleled,” said Patrick Grace, CEO of OEC. “She was instrumental in helping the company transition from traditional health insurance plans to self-insurance. She is the reason we have great insurance for our employees.”

Janet’s help and encouragement to all employees, their families and our board of trustees were a true reflection of the service-driven values OEC holds.

As she embarks on retirement, this same spirit of service will continue in all she sets out to do next. Janet’s 25 years of service have been invaluable to the organization’s success.

Congratulations, Janet Maginnis!

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Solar Vision | OEC News

How solar panels impact Norman Public Schools

As the sun reaches tendrils of its light towards the earth,large solar panels track them, rotating as the sun rises and sets each day.

Solar power is making notable progress as the renewable energy sector continues its rapid growth. Homes with solar panels attached to their roofs are becoming less of a surprising sight in the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, around 4% of homes adopted this renewable energy source with an increasing growth rate each year.

This is true right here in central Oklahoma.

“We’re seeing exponential growth in the homeowners who add solar to their house,” said Nick Shumaker, OEC manager of system engineering. “Currently, about 500 of our 60,000 accounts have installed solar at their homes.”

While the number is small, the increase in installs from year to year reveals a sharp rise in adoption of this technology. In 2012, OEC served just 19 solar accounts compared to 522 homes in 2022. A 1,833% increase in just over a decade. With solar energy trending up, OEC wants to ensure we are prepared for new and transitional types of energy.

“At the end of the day, we react to our members’ needs,” Shumaker said. “If our members are installing solar, if they’re buying EVs, whatever it is, we want to be part of the solution so we can remain what we have been since 1937 their trusted energy advisors and experts.”

OEC did just that after meeting with Norman Public Schools in 2019. NPS was looking for a partner to help decrease their expenses, nearly 80% of which were their facility expenses, including energy costs, Shumaker said.

“They came to us, and we want to help those in our community,” Shumaker said, “so the idea of this new solar park was born.”

Spanning 11 acres just east of Norman off Robinson Street, the park can generate an impressive 2,000 kilowatthours per hour—enough to power 350 homes annually. But how?

“Solar is unlike any other energy source we have,” Shumaker said. “Other energy sources are just turning a wind turbine or moving water to spin a turbine, but solar is a complicated chemical reaction.”

Solar panels contain silicone, which include electrical properties allowing it to serve as a foundation for electricity to flow, similar to metals in powerlines through which electricity flows from house to house, or in this case, from school to school, Shumaker said. When the sun hits silicone in the panels, photons energize and begin a frenzy of movement, creating electricity.

“The energy feeds into inverters, which take the energy generated at a direct current, or D.C., and turn it into alternating current, or A.C. power,” Shumaker said. “A.C. power is what the entire U.S. grid operates on because A.C. power is more efficient.”

A.C. power can run in multiple directions, meaning it can travel long distances, such as OEC’s extensive territory.

The A.C. power runs through a transformer contained by large, green boxes — you might see them in neighborhoods or along roads — then underground and into a pole and connects into our local grid. All that energy is used locally, Shumaker said.

“The energy from here is equivalent to the load of both NPS high schools,” Shumaker said. “So, everyone gets to enjoy it and have a touchpoint with it.”

While the energy comes easy on bright, sunny days, one of the challenges of solar is limited sunlight. During winter or on cloudy days, solar panels can produce less energy, which is why our energy partner, Western Farmers Electric Cooperative, generates power from various energy sources.

“You always need to use all the tools in your belt,” Shumaker said. “You can’t build an entire house with just a hammer, but that doesn’t mean the hammer isn’t a good tool. Natural gas and other energy sources are still a foundation, but tools like solar and wind power still help us build the house.”

OEC and NPS have partnered with the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association and the Department of Energy to continue researching how OEC can provide solar energy to members of low-to moderate-income.

Since installing solar panels on a residential home can cost upwards of $60,000, the realities of at-home solar production solar energy is out of reach for most people. The solar park, along with a 40-acre solar farm near Tuttle and the Solar Garden on Interstate 35 in Norman, allows people to experience solar power without that hefty cost, Shumaker said.

“We lease 11 acres from NPS right now, and we’re working on expanding to 15 acres for an educational pavilion, so we can provide tours and opportunities to learn about energy production for students and the public,” Shumaker said.

This partnership benefits both OEC and NPS. A statement on their website about the partnership reads: “The Norman Board of Education approved an agreement to lease district-owned land to OEC to develop the solar farm, which will reduce the school district’s energy costs and provide educational opportunities for students.”

With energy trends ever-shifting, OEC is committed to staying ahead of the curve and leveraging efficient renewable solutions for our members. We will continually strive to deliver exceptional service through innovative operations.

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Into the Sunset | OEC News

As the chair of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Engineering Subcommittee for Power Quality and Reliability, Nick Shumaker will help electric cooperatives face the challenges and opportunities of the future.

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Safer Surfing | OEC News

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Safer Surfing | OEC News

How to keep you and your information secure online

Cyber security is more critical now than ever. Stories of data breaches and compromised logins splash across the headlines regularly.

“At OEC Fiber, we value our subscribers’ security and online safety above all else,” said David Goodspeed, president of OEC Fiber. “We actively monitor for threats and do our best to block them before they gain access to the network. We want everyone to feel safe online, and educating our subscribers on what to do is part of that.”

Ready to make sure you stay secure when browsing online? A few preventive measures can help protect you against cyber threats before they strike!

CHECK YOUR PASSWORDS

Hackers love it when we get lazy with our passwords.

According to pcmag.com, 70% of people use the same password on more than one online account. While it may make them easier to remember, using the same password on multiple logins gives hackers more access to your sensitive data. Use a unique password for each account to help keep them secure.

While having multiple, unique passwords is ideal, remembering all of them can be difficult. Using a password manager such as LastPass, BitWarden or 1PAssword can be an excellent solution for remembering unique, secure passwords for every site. Password managers allow you to store all your passwords in one secure vault and automatically fill in your login information on each website with just one click. Not only that, but they also help protect against malicious hackers by preventing brute-force attacks and other cybercriminal techniques used to glean user data.

Remember, two-step authentication! Have a code sent to your email or phone; some services may have you answer a security question for an extra layer of protection. Two-step authentication will ensure only YOU can access your account and give you the heads up if someone else tries to get in.

SCAN FOR SCAMMERS

“When it comes to your online safety, scammers are getting smarter all the time,” said OEC Fiber’s senior manager of technology services and network operations, Michael Tomas. “They can make malicious emails look nearly identical to the real thing. That’s why you should always double-check any email addresses or content for anything suspicious before clicking on a link.”

Stay vigilant. Look for strange punctuation, spelling mistakes and email addresses from odd domains. Why would Amazon be sending you something from a Gmail account? These are all signs of a scammer trying to get their hands on your data.

SAFE SOCIAL SHARING

Stay connected to the people you care about while still practicing caution online. Social media is an excellent tool for communication and a source of entertainment. Still, only some people need access to our lives. 

“Don’t post everything online,” said David Madden, OEC Fiber’s supervisor of subscriber support. “Keep personal information private.”

From geo-tagging your vacation photos to live-tweeting an event, social media can be a great way to express yourself and document memories. But before you hit post, it is important to remember the potential danger of oversharing location information. You could tell unwelcome individuals where they can find or take advantage of you!

Limit the information in your profile. Even if the platform suggests it, try to leave any personal details off. When in doubt– keep it out; the fewer specifics you share online, the less likely someone can use that info for something nefarious.

Taking cyber security seriously is more important than ever. OEC Fiber is committed to doing all we can to keep you and your information safe. To learn more about online safety and the steps you can take to keep yourself safe online, visit oecfiber.com/blog to find more articles with online safety tips.

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Into the Sunset | OEC News

As the chair of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Engineering Subcommittee for Power Quality and Reliability, Nick Shumaker will help electric cooperatives face the challenges and opportunities of the future.

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Safer Surfing | OEC News

Learn about cyber security and how to stay safe when browsing the web. Find out what you can do to protect yourself from data breaches and compromised logins.

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Life at a Crossroads | OEC News

Fiber enables local shelter to better care for at-risk youth.

On Tecumseh Road in Norman, just off Interstate 35, hides a beacon of hope for children and teens in crisis. Crossroads Youth & Family Services offers a safe place to learn, grow and discover when a permanent home is unavailable.

“We are the only emergency shelter in Cleveland County,” said Executive Director Wendy Swatek.

Founded in 1969, Crossroads operates 33 other service agencies, additional shelters and services across the state. However, this eight-bed shelter is the only one Cleveland County has to offer for teens. Brightly colored, hand-painted murals and a warm, inviting atmosphere provide a sense of safety and security at a time when the young people within its walls need it most.

“The purpose of our shelter is kids have a place to stay until a permanent placement is found. Either in a foster home, an adoptive home or possibly a group home,” Swatek said.

This all-in-one facility houses a variety of spaces designed to give children and teens everything they need to thrive during a difficult time. Walking into the shared living space, it is not uncommon to see anime playing on the TV in one corner while someone plays a video game in another.

Teens have access to a full kitchen, art room and a resource closet where they shop for clothes, bedding and other essentials. A fullservice classroom sits on the far side of the shared space along a glass wall. Teachers from Norman Public Schools come here to keep the children’s education on track.

“Our shelter kids, it’s their home,” Swatek said. “They play here. They sleep here. They watch movies here. All the things you would do in your normal home. We have kiddos here that need all the support they can get, and we’re here providing a safe environment for them.”

To provide this support, Crossroads offers counseling and other family services designed to give children and families the best opportunity for success. They integrated the Head Start program, an income-based service for 0 to 5-year-olds, into their services in 2008. This program gives children a step up when they reach kindergarten.

“What’s unique about Head Start is that it’s a wrap-around service,” Swatek said. “Not only do we educate children in the classroom, but we also have family advocates that serve families as a whole. We goal set with families and help them find resources.”

With 200 to 250 kids coming through the shelter each year, the staffing and resources needed to ensure things run smoothly are hard to come by. With 275 employees serving over 1,050 kids in Head Start, staying on top of things is difficult. It is even harder when an unreliable internet connection hinders staff’s ability to access vital information.

“We use OEC Fiber because it’s the only service we found that works,” Swatek said. “When the internet works, our staff can print, get on their computers and do their intakes with their counseling clients. It’s really changed the way we’ve been able to do business.”

Staff are not the only ones affected by poor internet connection. Kids in the shelter are encouraged to engage in everyday activities like video games, streaming movies and YouTube. All of which require internet. Losing connectivity limits their options and can amplify feelings of ostracization during an already difficult time.

Due to the high-quality service OEC Fiber supplies, on-site safety at Crossroads has improved.

“We have cameras at our facility for safety purposes,” Swatek said. “There’s times we have to pull footage up, and we’re able to see it with a lot of detail because of the strength of our internet service.”

It takes more than good Wi-Fi to make this facility run. Volunteers engage in various activities, from general maintenance and landscaping to mentoring children.

“I always tell people to think about the needs around your house,” Swatek said.

The areas in which people can help are vast. Everything from assisting residents “shopping” in the resource room to keeping the facilities in top shape is encouraged.

Crossroads Youth & Family Services’ number one goal is to provide children with a safe environment where they can flourish. If you want to get involved in their mission, visit their website at crossroadsyfs.org to learn more and volunteer to improve lives.

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Into the Sunset | OEC News

As the chair of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Engineering Subcommittee for Power Quality and Reliability, Nick Shumaker will help electric cooperatives face the challenges and opportunities of the future.

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Energize Your Summer | OEC News

Middle school students eligible to attend the Youth Power Energy Camp

OEC is searching for the best and brightest eighth grade students in our seven-county service area to send to the action-packed, four day Youth Power Energy Camp!

Energy Camp is set for May 30 – June 2 at Canyon Camp and Conference Center near Hinton. Each year, OEC sponsors up to four students to attend the camp, where they will join 80 of their peers from across the state. Energy Camp helps develop leadership skills and promotes teamwork while teaching about cooperative principles, rural electrification and electrical safety.

If you have questions regarding the contest, Energy Camp or other OEC youth programs, contact Tory Tedder-Loffland at 217-6726 or tory@okcoop.org, or link.okcoop.org/energycamp23.

Procedure and Eligibility

Procedure and Eligibility 

Students currently enrolled in eighth grade qualify and must meet the requirements listed to the left, including a resume, letter of recommendation and the online application.

Energy Camp is part of OEC’s youth development initiative, L.E.A.R.N.: Leading, Educating, Advancing and Rewarding the Next generation. L.E.A.R.N. encompasses the catalog of youth programs OEC offers to students, teachers and schools in our service area.

Contest Requirements:

  1. Applicants must answer at least two short-answer questions on the online application at link.okcoop.org/energycamp23.
  2. Applicants must submit a resume of their curricular, extracurricular and leadership activities. Include awards, recognitions and certificates. Also include club memberships, offices held, hobbies, community involvement and special interests.
  3. Applicants must submit a letter of recommendation from a teacher, principal or community leader.
  4. Complete the online application at: link.okcoop.org/energycamp23 and upload the resume and letter of recommendation. Contact Tory (405-217-6726) if you experience technical difficulties or would like a  printed application.
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Into the Sunset | OEC News

As the chair of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Engineering Subcommittee for Power Quality and Reliability, Nick Shumaker will help electric cooperatives face the challenges and opportunities of the future.

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Safer Surfing | OEC News

Learn about cyber security and how to stay safe when browsing the web. Find out what you can do to protect yourself from data breaches and compromised logins.

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New Year New Savings | OEC News

Keep energy costs low and your house warm this winter

The turkeys are eaten, the presents unwrapped, new year’s kisses kissed and just like that, the holiday season has drawn to a close, but winter’s chill remains. As we head into the long stretch of winter, now is the perfect opportunity to review some easy energy efficiency tips from our Energy Efficiency & Solutions Specialist, Daniel Lofland. Keep warm indoors, and make a real difference in reducing energy costs by reading our nine energy efficiency tips!

1. Take Advantage of Heat from the Sun. That big beautiful glowing ball in the sky casts a ton of heat. Why not open the blinds and curtains in your home and let the sun do its job? When sunlight makes its way into the home, it heats up whatever objects it hits for free! However, please only use this advice in the winter for obvious reasons. We do not need to make our air conditioners work any harder than they already do in the summer.

2. Cover Drafty Windows. Let’s take this further than simply “covering” drafty windows. If you have a drafty window, seal it up rather than just covering it. Unless your cover creates a proper air barrier, drafts still make their way into the home. Caulk window sills where the window meets sheetrock to ensure no outside air makes it into the home.

3. Adjust the Temperature. Adjusting thermostats is the obvious answer for the most savings. Depending on many factors, adjusting temperature can save up to a 4 to 8% per degree decrease in heating or increase in cooling temperature. In effect, it decreases the cost of the heating and cooling portion of your bill. If you have a heat pump, we recommend finding the temperature that best suits you and your family and leaving it there. Making temperature changes on a heat pump can make the system think it needs help to increase the temperature. Heat pumps increase the temperature in the form of auxiliary heating, which means turning on a bunch of blow dryers to help heat the home. As you can imagine, that is not efficient for your energy bills.

4. Find and Seal Leaks. There are specific places to look for leaks in a home, such as plumbing penetrations, window casings and doors. To find more typical in-home leakage areas, sign up for our Home Energy Consultation Program at okcoop.org/hecp/, and our energy auditors will run a test called a “blower door” which highlights any air leaking in the home.

5. Maintain Your Heating. Systems. Scheduling routine service of your heat and air conditioning systems helps ensure they operate as efficiently as possible. We recommend replacing air filters monthly during peak usage seasons such as winter and summer. Those systems depend on airflow, and a clogged filter restricts that airflow. If you are an Amazon user, try the subscribe and save function to schedule air filter deliveries every month, so reminders literally come in the mail!

6. Reduce Heat Loss from the Fireplace. While not using your fireplace, make sure the dampener is in the closed position. If the dampener is open and the fireplace is not in use, it is like having a window open in your home.

7. Lower Water Heating Costs. We recommend keeping water heater temperatures at 115 to 120 degrees. This will not only save money but will also prevent scalding. We also recommend installing a water heater timer to save more money. Timers allow control of how often the water heater actually needs to kick on and heat water, think high usage times like mornings and evenings. OEC even offers a rebate of $50 for them!

8. Lower Holiday Lighting Costs. Using LEDs for Christmas lights can save a ton over the less efficient incandescent versions. Putting those lights on a timer can also save money. An incandescent C9 bulb uses seven watts per bulb. Moreover, strands have 25 lights, with a two-strand connection max. If there are 25 bulbs in a strand, we are at 50 bulbs between the two strands or 350 watts. An LED C9 bulb uses 0.10 watts per bulb. For the same number of bulbs, the LED version uses five watts. LED is the winner in this= efficiency competition!

9. Stay Warm with Clothes and Blankets. Some of us heard this a lot during our childhoods. “If you are cold, go grab a blanket!” As much as we may not think highly of that memory, it is sound advice for ways to save in the winter. Lower the thermostat temperature and add a layer of clothes, grab a blanket or BOTH! Those layers add insulation from the cold house and help trap body heat!

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Into the Sunset | OEC News

As the chair of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Engineering Subcommittee for Power Quality and Reliability, Nick Shumaker will help electric cooperatives face the challenges and opportunities of the future.

Read More »

Safer Surfing | OEC News

Learn about cyber security and how to stay safe when browsing the web. Find out what you can do to protect yourself from data breaches and compromised logins.

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A Seat at the Table | OEC News

OEC engineer named subcommittee chair

OEC manager of system engineering, Nick Shumaker, was named the Chair of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Engineering Subcommittee for Power Quality and Reliability.

The committee, comprised of experts in their field, makes it their mission to prepare electric cooperatives for the challenges and opportunities of the future by helping cooperatives to strengthen their system reliability and enhance power quality, Shumaker said.

“I am honored to have my work in electric reliability recognized and look forward to supporting the entire cooperative community,” Shumaker said.

As the chair, Shumaker oversees the committee’s collaboration with industry partners such as the Electric Power Research Institute to provide research on system hardening, new technologies and infrastructure reliability.

Congratulations, Nick Shumaker!

Learn more about NRECA’s reliability and security resources at cooperative.com/topics/reliability-security/Pages/default.aspx

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Into the Sunset | OEC News

As the chair of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Engineering Subcommittee for Power Quality and Reliability, Nick Shumaker will help electric cooperatives face the challenges and opportunities of the future.

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From the Top with CEO Patrick Grace – January 2023

Recently, two substations were targeted with gunfire in central North Carolina, resulting in physical damage to the site and a blackout in the wider region. The electric system is integral to our daily lives, providing reliable and consistent power to get us through the day. Unfortunately, the electric system is not without risks such as this. Substations are exposed to elements like storms, fire, theft and vandalism. These are all threats to the system, but securing and protecting the grid is a top priority of Oklahoma Electric Cooperative and other companies in the electric sector.

Staying ahead of these challenges is a collaborative effort, and co-ops work alongside industry partners, peer organizations, government agencies and local officials to share information and strengthen our systems. Take, for example, the Franklin substation that caught fire from copper theft 10 years ago.

The incident caused months of reconstruction, but fortunately, the community regained power quickly due to temporary mobile stations provided by our wholesale power provider Western Farmers Electric Cooperative. This is just a small example of how electric cooperatives incorporate multiple layers of protection across our systems to monitor and secure critical infrastructure from natural and man-made threats.

We also protect critical substations with a combination of tools and tactics – including locks, physical barriers, security cameras and more.

For OEC, we reflect this value in our investments in system planning, including system hardening and strengthening reliability. In 2021, we began planning the Adaptively Controlled Electric System project, or ACES. The project includes 11 devices impacting four electric feeders and three substations in the Norman and Noble area. These devices help our system “self-heal” during outages. Since the project launched in October 2021, outages in this area have decreased by nearly 40%. To learn more about our system planning venture, visit link.okcoop.org/reliability.

We continuously monitor, evaluate and prepare for threats to the grid. Rest assured, we are prepared to respond and restore your power quickly in the case of external interference in our electric system.

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From the Top with CEO Patrick Grace – December 2022

Over the years, the OEC News has remained our best way to communicate and connect with our member-owners. While the foundations of this publication, like classifieds, recipes and member stories, have remained a constant, longtime readers of the OEC News will have noticed some changes. 

We tweak and improve the OEC News every month. If you enjoyed this publication in the past eight years, it is in large part due to our editor and creative director, Brianna Wall. December marks Brianna’s 100th issue as editor of the OEC News! It also marks her last as she has accepted an internal promotion and will lead our entire member communications efforts moving forward. Rest assured, you are in good hands with our new editor, JoMarie Ramsey, and Brianna at the helm. 

This publication represents part of OEC’s effort to communicate and celebrate the cooperative difference. While many of the themes and stories changed over the last eight years, the mission has remained the same: communicate to our member-owners the value of being a member of OEC…and do it in a clear, informative, entertaining and professional way. 

Brianna’s work in this area has been outstanding, but do not just take my word for it. The OEC News and Brianna have been recognized across the state and nation as a leader in cooperative communication, earning over 45 awards and recognitions under Brianna’s leadership! My hope is that you, the reader, have noticed and appreciated the great work. After all, we work for you, our members. 

I want to thank her personally for the work she does in editing and cleaning up this column every month. She somehow makes my column come across as smooth, professional and even interesting. Let me assure you that is a tall task! 

Please join me in thanking Brianna for serving you for the past 100 issues by dropping her a quick note of appreciation. Her email is listed just below this column for one last time, just as it has been for the past 100 months.

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Into the Sunset | OEC News

As the chair of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Engineering Subcommittee for Power Quality and Reliability, Nick Shumaker will help electric cooperatives face the challenges and opportunities of the future.

Read More »

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